No more prepping, no more plans. Summer reading – oh, so grand!

Ah! Summer, with its tall, frosty drinks, loungy chairs, and good reads. If you’re like me, you’ve been stockpiling books since Christmas, just waiting for long, easy afternoons to dive in. By now I have a pretty good stack of kid books, teacher books, and one or two just-for-fun books by my bed. Here are ten of the books that are waiting for me. I’d love to hear what’s on your summer reading list!

Links are to Amazon. I don’t get a kickback or anything, but I like Amazon! Feel free to buy wherever you like, or get them from your local library!

  1. The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie- Let’s start with fun. Every few years I go on an Agatha Christie binge, and this summer I’m heading for one. I’ll start with my favorite sleuth, Hercule Poirot, and my favorite mystery – The Mysterious Affair at Styles. I just can’t get enough of that dapper Belgian who famously solves cases using “Order and Method, Hastings! Order and method!” Perhaps I can channel my inner Poirot and bring some order and method to my closets this summer…. Hm…..
  2. Mindset Mathematics: Visualizing and Investigating Big Ideas, Grade 5 by Jo Boaler- In my classroom, we believe in the Power of Yet, and I spend a lot of time on Youcubed, Jo Boaler’s website. So, a book that brings together Carol Dweck and Jo Boaler seems like a gift. Plus, my principal let it slip that he’s reading Mathematical Mindsets by Jo Boaler, and I’ve got to keep up with him! She’s written a book about the big ideas at every grade level from 3rd grade to 8th grade. She’s likely got you covered!
  3. Differentiation and the Brain by Carol Ann Tomlinson- I first read Carol Ann Tomlinson’s amazing work in 1999, and I keep coming back to her. I can’t wait to find out more about the connection between brain research (a longstanding interest of mine) and differentiation. I imagine this book will revitalize my teaching for next year.
  4. A Framework for K-12 Science Education by the National Research Council- I’ve been dipping my toe in this book since November, but this summer I’m looking forward to a good, long dive! So far, it’s completely wonderful, and I am really excited to have the time to spend with it. I imagine I will spend most of the summer really digesting this book and pulling out all of the information I need to bring Science alive in my classroom.
  5. Big, Bad Ironclad! by Nathan Hale- I have to admit, I keep trying, unsuccessfully, to understand the appeal of graphic novels. My students devour them, and so, I keep on trying. My son assures me that, with my love of history, this book will grab me. We’ll see.
  6. Americanized – Rebel Without a Green Card by Sara Saedi – I want to be ready for the current issues dredged up by the election next year, and I suspect immigration will be one of them. This book looks like a great read for my advanced readers, and I think it will be very timely. Plus, it’s supposed to be hilarious, and I do love a funny book!
  7. Breathing New Life into Book Clubs: a Practical Guide for Teachers by Sonja Cherry-Paul and Dana Johansen – I don’t know these authors at all, but my book clubs this year have been, well, lackluster is probably a kind adjective. If this book can help me revitalize things for next year, that would be amazing!
  8. Bomb by Steve Sheinkin – This has actually been on my reading list for years, and it just keeps slipping down the pile. We briefly studied the Manhattan Project this year, and one of my students stumbled on this book. He thinks I will love it, and frankly, so do I. Update: I finished reading Bomb. Loved it!!!! Click here to read my review.
  9. The Birth of Black American: The First African Americans and the Pursuit of Freedom at Jamestown by Tim Hashaw – I actually just started this one, and it’s really great. It’s not an easy summer read – I’m taking it one chapter at a time, with some lighter reading in between chapters. but, I’m learning so much that I didn’t know, and I can’t wait to get back and teach history next year. We can really get beyond the textbook next year.
  10. Among Schoolchildren by Tracy Kidder – This book was published the year I student-taught, and it was required reading for us that year. Tracy Kidder followed Mrs. Zajac and her class for a year, and this true story resonated with me immediately. Every August I return to this wise, poignant classic, and it puts me in the right frame of mind to start another year. Each time I learn something new from Mrs. Zajac and the students in her care. I hope it will do the same for you.

Those are a few of the books I’m planning to read this summer. I’d love to hear what you’re reading. I’m always on the prowl for a good read, so, please share your thoughts in the comments.

Happy Reading!

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